Research Roundup: ‘Medicare For All’; Surprise Medical Bills; And Contraception

Research Roundup: ‘Medicare For All’; Surprise Medical Bills; And Contraception

Each week, KHN compiles a selection of recently released health policy studies and briefs.

The Friday Breeze Want to read the best and most provocative stories from the week? Welcome to the Friday Breeze, where we compile them all — so you’re set with your weekend reading.
Each week, KHN's Shefali Luthra finds interesting reads from around the Web.
Media outlets report on news from D.C., Texas, Rhode Island, New York, Wisconsin, Iowa, Arizona, Ohio, Florida, Minnesota, California, Missouri, Louisiana, Maryland and Massachusetts.
News from state legislatures comes out of Louisiana, Iowa, New York, Minnesota, Connecticut, Florida and California.
An analysis finds that 78 percent of all individuals included in genomic studies of disease up to 2018 were of European descent. In other public health news: loneliness in teens, childhood trauma, trigger warnings, cancer and vaccines by mail.
"Fertility issues for kids with cancer were ignored" for years, said University of Pittsburgh reproductive scientist Kyle Orwig. "Many of us dream of growing up and having our own families. We hope our research will help these young patients to do that." Until now, boys hadn't had a realistic option to preserve their fertility, but that may be changing.
The family that found Purdue Pharma has come under intense scrutiny as of late after it was revealed just how deeply involved some of the members were in the early aggressive marketing tactics pursued by the opioid-maker. Meanwhile, an advocacy group is calling on the FDA to impose a moratorium on approving new opioids.
A report warns that artificial intelligence can be easily duped with tiny pieces of data. The authors say bad actors could hack into records and make it seem like there's an illness there that isn't. But more likely is that doctors, hospitals and other organizations could manipulate the A.I. in billing or insurance software in an effort to maximize the money coming their way. In other health technology news: a day of reckoning is coming for digital health, the FDA calls for tighter security of electronic health records following a KHN report, and data breaches from the states.
NYC Mayor and potential 2020 presidential hopeful Bill de Blasio is talking up his plan to tackle mental health issues in the city, but there is little concrete evidence to demonstrate that the expensive proposal has seen any success.
Today's early morning highlights from the major news organizations.
The first surprise was the massive heart attack, which struck as Debbie Moehnke waited in a Vancouver, Wash., medical clinic last summer. “She had an appointment because her feet were swollen real bad,” said Larry Moehnke, her husband. “But she got in there and it was like, ‘I can’t breathe, I can’t breathe!’” Her life suddenly at risk, the 59-year-old was rushed by ambulance, first to a local hospital, where she was stabilized, and then, the next day, to Oregon Health & Science University across the river in Portland for urgent cardiac care.
The U.S. Surgeon General’s office estimates that more than 20 million people have a substance use disorder. Meanwhile, the nation’s drug overdose crisis shows no sign of slowing. Yet, by all accounts, there aren’t nearly enough physicians who specialize in treating addiction — doctors with extensive clinical training who are board-certified in addiction medicine. The opioid epidemic has made this doctor deficit painfully apparent. And it’s spurring medical institutions around the country to create fellowships for aspiring doctors who want to treat substance use disorder with the same...
Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Scott Gottlieb on Wednesday called for tighter scrutiny of electronic health records systems, which have prompted thousands of reports of patient injuries and other safety problems over the past decade. “What we really need is a much more tailored approach, so that we have appropriate oversight of EHRs when they’re doing things that could create risk for patients,” Gottlieb said in an interview with Kaiser Health News.
Julie Rovner Kaiser Health News @jrovner Read Julie's Stories Anna Edney Bloomberg @annaedney Read Anna's Stories
Each week, KHN compiles a selection of recently released health policy studies and briefs.
Media outlets report on news from Rhode Island, Tennessee, Ohio, Texas, Massachusetts, D.C., Florida, California, Virginia, New York, Maryland, Texas, Minnesota and Georgia.
News on the state legislatures comes out of Georgia, Florida, Connecticut, California, Maryland, Ohio and Virginia.